Evolution

Evolution is not an inevitable march forward into perfection; it is an unending, unyielding, messy red. Like death, he visits us all. Like death, he is not cruel.

The current iteration of our world, our bodies, ourselves is the best it will ever be! The great bias of history.

We forget we are the next in the line of progression to be bumped off eventually and maybe we are the failed branch in the family tree. It is not for us to know. It will be those digging up the impressions of our bones on rock our names and dreams forgotten who decide.

rlb 5.20.17

Books have always played a huge role in my life. From getting frustrated with librarians as a kid because they ran out of Chinese fairytales to eventually becoming an English major books have always been my escape. They got me through my first heartbreak and depression as a teenager and eventually gave me a college […]

via Relearning to Read — My Roaring Twenties

entitlement

The most brilliant woman to walk through the halls of my podunk women’s college was A– , a member of the Laguna Pueblo and Blackfeet tribes, if my memory serves. From the start she would proclaim this with the pride it deserved and from the start no fewer than half of us who heard it would look down on her as if she had taken from us something we should have had. The entitlement is strong among southern white girlchildren.

She was courage incarnate. Unafraid to attempt to expel nearly a dozen girls in one fell swoop for their racist parody script in Theater– they didn’t walk at graduation and their absence was marked by even the filthy rich donors, their sins made known through the almighty internet grapevine– while stubbornly double-majoring in English and Psychology and to top things off she had a baby her junior year, finished her degrees with a newborn on her hip.

“Grace” is too fragile a descriptor for this woman, let me tell you what.

Her family came together to bouey her. At least that’s how it appeared from the outside, from a distance, from my limited perspective hardly knowing her. They were on campus with hot food, with gifts, with affections. As guest speakers working to educate our sorry asses and as friends to those who were kind to their daughter. Even her boyfriend stayed at her side– I think in the end he married her. Oh how we lonely, unloved Others burned with envy, with jealousy, for what we thought we should have had. As if our wanting somehow warranted another’s deprivation. As if there should be a limit placed on the love in the world.

Last time I checked Facebook she was leaving Standing Rock– likely with her small human and family in tow. And to my classmates who sniffed in irritation every time we heard this woman proclaim her ancestry I have to ask, “What have we done since graduation?”

Anti-Intellectualism & Education Theory, pt. 2

Instead of staying up in the airy space of theoretical perspectives and academia while pondering the problem of U.S. students being failed by our Education system I’ve been trying to spend the last few years getting to the root of the problem instead. (Yes, I’ve been thinking about a problem longer than I’ve kept this blog. Shocking, I know.)

The question I’ve come up with to address that root is this: Why is the United States so rabidly anti-intellectual?

Yeah, because that’s going to be a simple question to answer.

Continue reading “Anti-Intellectualism & Education Theory, pt. 2”